Biological control of vectors of disease

sixthreport of the WHO Expert Committee on Vector Biology and Control.
  • 39 Pages
  • 1.49 MB
  • 7767 Downloads
  • English
by
World Health Organization , Geneva
Pests -- Control., Vector control -- Biological con
SeriesWHO technical report series -- 679
The Physical Object
Pagination39p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20324355M
ISBN 109241206799
OCLC/WorldCa9829314

Covering the theory and practice of non-insecticidal control of insect vectors of human disease, this book provides an overview of methods including the use of botanical biocides and insect-derived semiochemicals, with an overall focus on integrated vector management Format: Hardcover.

The book also presents improved mass production procedures of microbial and viral biocontrol agents, as well as regulatory and environmental aspects of genetically engineered biocontrol agents.

Biotechnology for Biological Control of Pests and Vectors will provide a valuable reference for researchers and students of biological control, microbiology, virology, and molecular by:   Biology of Disease Vectors presents a comprehensive and advanced discussion of disease vectors and what the future may hold for their control.

This edition examines the control of disease vectors through topics such as general biological requirements of vectors, epidemiology, physiology and molecular biology, genetics, principles of control and Book Edition: 2.

Covering the theory and practice of non-insecticidal control of insect vectors of human disease, this book provides an overview of methods including the use of botanical biocides and insect-derived semiochemicals, with an overall focus on integrated vector management.

Biological and environmental control of disease vectors. Description This book, inclusive of 11 chapters, discusses various non-pesticide-based control strategies against several medically-important disease vector species, including those relevant to the control of malaria, dengue, schistosomiasis, and lymphatic by: 6.

Biological control of human disease vectors: a perspective on challenges and opportunities Article (PDF Available) in BioControl 63(7) May with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'. Integrated vector management (IVM) is the strategic approach to vector control promoted by WHO (1) and includes control of the vectors of dengue.

Defined as “a rational decision-making process for the optimal use of resources for vector control”, IVM considers five key elements in the management process, namely. Biological Control of Plant Pathogens: Research, Commercialization, Application Fig. Example bioassay for biological control of a plant pathogen.

Begonias were grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with Botrytis cinerea under conditions optimal for the development of disease. Treatments differing in their efficacy are shown, from left to right.

Make sure you keep strict hygiene control of food, and avoid unpasteurized dairy products in areas where tick-borne encephalitis can be transmitted. if you are bitten and receive care abroad, remember to complete your course of treatment at home.

if you become ill upon your return, tell your doctor where you have been, asFile Size: KB. Prevent agricultural loss with natural disease controls that don’t harm the environment—or the people who live in it Despite the worldwide use of chemicals and pesticides to control the devastating effects of plant disease, the international agribusiness market still suffers extensive economic losses each year.

Biological Control of Plant Diseases offers. Chemical insecticides are the mainstay of contemporary control of human disease vectors.

However, the spread of insecticide resistance and the emergence of This perspective paper explores whether biological control might be able to make a greater contribution to vector control in the future, and highlights some of the challenges in taking a Cited by: This book provides recent contributions of current strategies to control insect pests written by experts in their respective fields.

Topics include semiochemicals based insect management techniques, assessment of lethal dose/concentrations, strategies for efficient biological control practices, bioinsecticidal formulations and mechanisms of action involving RNAi technology, Cited by: 2.

Biology of Disease Vectors presents a comprehensive and advanced discussion of disease vectors and what the future may hold for their control. This edition examines the control of disease vectors through topics such as general biological requirements of vectors, epidemiology, physiology and molecular biology, genetics, principles of control and.

Thus, the biological control of disease vectors offers an environmentally safe alternative to pesticide use in managing costly or deadly vector-borne diseases.

Although biological control of vectors provides a potentially important tool for controlling vector-borne diseases, a successful control program requires a thorough understanding of the interactions between the host–vector disease community and the biological control agents that attack the by:   The concluding chapter presents ways of suppressing the vectors that cause diseases, such as malaria, typhus, filariasis, dysentery, trypanosomiasis, and dengue.

The book appeals to students of entomology, plant pathology, human and veterinary medicine, virology, zoology, microbiology, and other branches of Edition: 1.

This book describes new strategies being used to combat disease agents and invertebrate pests. Outstanding experts from the United States, Belgium, China, Guatemala, Japan, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand have contributed chapters that cover the latest achievements in genetic engineering, emphasizing the microbial and viral biological control agents that can provide.

Mapping tool on tracking biological challenges to malaria control and elimination A new interactive map showing malaria vector resistance, P. falciparum gene deletions, and antimalarial efficacy and resistance has been released.

Such information is critical to inform appropriate malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies and to guide the development of new. Mosquitoes represent the major arthropod vectors of human disease worldwide transmitting malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and arboviruses such as dengue virus and Zika virus.

Unfortunately, no treatment (in the form of vaccines or drugs) is available for most of these diseases and vector control is still the main form of by: This book, inclusive of 11 chapters, discusses various non-pesticide-based control strategies against several medically-important disease vector species, including those relevant to the control of malaria, dengue, schistosomiasis, and lymphatic filariasis.

Each chapter is dedicated to the discussion of a specific strategy, which includes biological control with arthropods, fungi, Cited by: 6. Classical and augmentative biological control against diseases and pests: critical status analysis and review of factors Many thanks are expressed to Ute KOCH for her assistance with the lay out of the book.

Contributors. Evolution of the yearly number of publications dedicated to biological control of plant diseases based on a File Size: 2MB.

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Biological control of vectors using natural enemies or competitors can reduce vector density and hence disease transmission. However, the indirect interactions inherent in host–vector disease systems make it difficult to use traditional pest control Cited by: The control of mosquitoes and other insect vectors of human pathogens in an area-wide, environmentally and sustainable way is critical to solving global health problems in the developing world but also to industrialized countries that already have in place efficient vector control.

The call for malaria control, over the last century, marked a new epoch in the history of this disease. Many control strategies targeting either the Author: Layla Kamareddine.

Biology of Disease Vectors presents a comprehensive and advanced discussion of disease vectors and what the future may hold for their control. This edition examines the control of disease vectors through topics such as general biological requirements of vectors, epidemiology, physiology and molecular biology, genetics, principles of control and Brand: Elsevier Science.

Disease vectors remain a major public health challenge in spite of efforts done to control across Tanzania. Different disease vectors have been controlled and efforts are on to eradicate them but challenges are still emerging and managed. In spite of all these success, different disease vectors have been observed to have developed resistance to all classes of insecticides used Author: Eliningaya J.

Kweka, Epiphania E. Kimaro, Esther G. Kimaro, YakobP. Nagagi, Imna I. Malele. Biological control of vectors of disease: sixth report of the WHO Expert Committee on Vector Biology and Control. Author: WHO Expert Committee on Vector Biology and Control.

Product Information. This book describes new strategies being used to combat disease agents and invertebrate pests. Outstanding experts from the United States, Belgium, China, Guatemala, Japan, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand have contributed chapters that cover the latest achievements in genetic engineering, emphasizing the microbial and viral biological control.

Control with arthropods --Use of larvivorous fish in biological and environmental control of disease vectors --The use of plants in vector control --Control of disease vectors using fungi --Vector control using semiochemicals --House screening --Sanitation and vector control --Water management for disease vector control --Integrated vector management --Evidence required.

A disease vector is any living organism that transmits an infectious disease to humans (or in agriculture to animals and plants). A vector picks up the disease from an infected host or the environment then transfers it to a new host through a bite when feeding or by mechanical transmission such as defecating on the skin or from particles on the outside of the body.

Description Biological control of vectors of disease PDF

A vector is a living organism that transmits an infectious agent from an infected animal to a human or another animal. Vectors are frequently arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, flies, fleas and lice. Vectors can transmit infectious diseases either actively or passively: Biological vectors, such as mosquitoes and ticks may carry pathogens that can multiply.

alternative to disease prevention by vector control. Both prevention and treatment are needed. • Biological control: The use of predators (natural enemies of the vectors), flies are methods to control vectors and reduce the risk of infection.Vector control is any method to limit or eradicate the mammals, birds, insects or other arthropods (here collectively called "vectors") which transmit disease most frequent type of vector control is mosquito control using a variety of strategies.

Several of the "neglected tropical diseases" are spread by such vectors.1. Biological vectors are those carrier organisms (invertebrate animals) in which the parasites (disease agents) increase their numbers by multiplication or transformation inside the body of the carrier-organisms.

For example, female Anopheles mosquito is regarded as the biological vector of Plasmodium sp.

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(malarial parasite). 2. Mechanical.